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JsonRpc.Router

A .NetStandard 2.1 IRouter implementation for Json Rpc v2 requests for Microsoft.AspNetCore.Routing.

The requirements/specifications are all based off of the Json Rpc 2.0 Specification

Installation

NuGet: JsonRpc.Router

dotnet CLI:

dotnet add package EdjCase.JsonRpc.Router

Nuget CLI:

Install-Package EdjCase.JsonRpc.Router

Usage

Minimum config

Create a ASP.NET Core Web Application, reference this library and in the Startup class configure the following:

Add the dependency injected services in the ConfigureServices method:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
	services.AddJsonRpc();
}

Add the JsonRpc router the pipeline in the Configure method:

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
{
	app.UseJsonRpc();
}

Add a RpcController class with public methods:

public class ItemsController : RpcController
{
	public Item Get(int id)
	{
		//Code here...
	}
	
	public void Add(Item item)
	{
		//Code here...
	}
}

Thats it! The library will auto detect the controllers that are child classes of RpcController and will expose all public methods to the api. The url route in this case will be '/Items' because the controller name is 'Items'Controller. (If the controller does not end with 'Controller' the route will be the class name)

Advanced Config

Create a ASP.NET Core Web Application, reference this library and in the Startup class configure the following:

Add the dependency injected services in the ConfigureServices method:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
	services
		.AddJsonRpc(config =>
		{
			//(Optional) Hard cap on batch size, will block requests will larger sizes, defaults to no limit
			config.BatchRequestLimit = 5;
			//(Optional) If true returns full error messages in response, defaults to false
			config.ShowServerExceptions = false;
			//(Optional) Configure how the router serializes requests
			config.JsonSerializerSettings = new System.Text.Json.JsonSerializerOptions
			{
				//Example json config
				IgnoreNullValues = false,
				WriteIndented = true
			};
			//(Optional) Configure custom exception handling for exceptions during invocation of the method
			config.OnInvokeException = (context) =>
			{
				if (context.Exception is InvalidOperationException)
				{
					//Handle a certain type of exception and return a custom response instead
					//of an internal server error
					int customErrorCode = 1;
					var customData = new
					{
						Field = "Value"
					};
					var response = new RpcMethodErrorResult(customErrorCode, "Custom message", customData);
					return OnExceptionResult.UseObjectResponse(response);
				}
				//Continue to throw the exception
				return OnExceptionResult.DontHandle();
			};
		});
		});
}

There are multiple ways to add JSONRpc middleware in the Configure method

  1. Full Auto Detection
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
    //This will register all the classes that derive from `RpcController` and their public instance methods
	app.UseJsonRpc();
}
  1. Derived Controllers Auto Detection
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
    //This will register all the classes that derive from `ControllerBase` and their public instance methods
    //E.g. `ControllerBase` has 3 child classes/controllers (CustomController, OtherController, Commands) so by default 
	//three routes would be `Custom`, `Other` and `Commands` respectively, but since CustomController is decorated with RpcRouteAttribute("Main"),
	//its route will be `Main` instead of `Custom`
	app.UseJsonRpcWithBaseController<ControllerBase>();
}
  1. Manual controller registration
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
	app.UseJsonRpc(options =>
    {
    	options
    		//Will make controller methods available for path '/First', unless overridden by RpcRouteAttribute
    		//Note that any class will work here, not just a class derived from `RpcController`
    		.AddController<NonRpcController>()
    		//Will make controller methods available for custom path '/CustomPath'
    		//Note that the same controller can be available under multiple routes
    		.AddControllerWithCustomPath<NonRpcController>("CustomPath");
    });
}
  1. Manual method registration
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
	app.UseJsonRpc(options =>
    {
		MethodInfo customControllerMethod1 = typeof(CustomController).GetMethod("Method1");
		MethodInfo otherControllerMethod1 = typeof(OtherController).GetMethod("Method1");
		options
			//Will make the `Method1` method in `CustomController` available with route '/'
			//Note that since that method has `RpcRouteAttribute("Method")`, that will change the method name
			//from `Method1` to `Method` in the router
			.AddMethod(customControllerMethod1)
			//Will make the `Method1` method in `OtherController` available with route '/CustomMethods'
			.AddMethod(otherControllerMethod1, "CustomMethods");
    });
}

Examples of Rpc Classes:

Recommended format is to use subclasses of RpcController. These classes will be autodetected if using the UseJsonRpc() method (option 1 from above)

[RpcRoute("TestMethods")] //Optional, if not specified the route name would be 'Test' (based off the controller type name)
public class TestController : RpcController
{
	//Will return a success response or an error response dependening on the if statement
	// (See IRpcMethodResult usage below)
	public IRpcMethodResult CustomResult()
	{
		if(/*something is invalid*/)
		{
			return this.Error(customErrorCode, errorMesssage); //Or return new RpcMethodErrorResult(customErrorCode, errorMessage);
		}
		return this.Ok(optionalReturnObject);//Or return new RpcMethodSuccessResult(optionalReturnObject);
	}
	
	//Returning values is also valid but will never give an error unless an exception is thrown
	public int Subtract(int a, int b)
	{
		return a - b;
	}    
	
	//Accessable to api at /{OptionalRoutePrefix}/{OptionalRoute}/Add 
	//e.g. (from previous example) /RpcApi/Add or /RpcApi/Class2/Add
	//Example request using param list: {"jsonrpc": "2.0", "id": 1, "method": "Add", "params": [1,2]}
	//Example request using param map: {"jsonrpc": "2.0", "id": 1, "method": "Add", "params": {"a": 1, "b": 2}}
	//Example response from a=1, b=2: {"jsonrpc", "2.0", "id": 1, "result": 3}
	public int Add(int a, int b)
	{
		return a + b;
	}
	
	//This method would use the same request as Add(int a, int b) (except method would be 'AddAsync') 
	//and would respond with the same response
	public async Task<int> AddAsync(int a, int b)
	{
		//async adding here
	}
	
	//Can't be called/will return MethodNotFound because it is private. Same with all non-public/static methods.
	private void Hidden1()
	{
	}
}

And or if manually mapping (not auto detection) any class can be used for Rpc calls if configured in Startup.cs

//Classes can be named anything and be located anywhere in the project/solution
//The way to associate them to the api is to use the RegisterController<T> method in
//the configuration
public class RpcClass1
{
	public int Add(int a, int b)
	{
		return a + b;
	}
}

Any method in the registered class that is a public instance method will be accessable through the Json Rpc Api.

The controllers and manual registration CAN be used at the same time. Mix and match as needed.

Custom Rpc Responses

In order to specify different types of responses (such as errors and successful result objects) in the same method IRpcMethodResult can be used as a return type. If the router detects the returned object is a IRpcMethodResult then it will call the ToRpcReponse(...) method and use that as the response. The default implementations are for simple error and success routes. The RpcMethodErrorResult will use the error code, message and data to create an error response. The RpcMethodSuccessResult will use the optional return object to create a successful response.

Any custom implementation of the IRpcMethodResult can be used for application specific purposes. One common use may be to unify the custom rpc error codes that one specific application uses.

There are two helper methods in the RpcController class: this.Ok(obj) and this.Error(code, message, data). They are just wrappers around the implementations of IRpcMethodResult. So return this.Ok(obj); is equivalent to return new RpcMethodSuccessResult(obj).

Misc

Bulk requests are supported (as specificed in JsonRpc 2.0 docs) and will all be run asynchronously. The responses may be in a different order than the requests.

On specifics on how to create requests and what to expect from responses, use the Json Rpc 2.0 Specification.

Contributions

Contributions welcome. Fork as much as you want. All pull requests will be considered.

Best way to develop is to use Visual Studio 2015+ or Visual Studio Code on other platforms besides windows.

Also the correct dnx runtime has to be installed if visual studio does not automatically do that for you. Information on that can be found at the Asp.Net Repo.

Note: I am picky about styling/readability of the code. Try to keep it similar to the current format.

Feedback

If you do not want to contribute directly, feel free to do bug/feature requests through github or send me and email [email protected]

Todos

  • Better sample app
  • Performance testing

License

MIT

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