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A convenient way to initialize your application.

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Introduction

We all know, that every application should contain readme file and Installation section with list of actions that you should to do for preparing an application to work.

Typical instruction:

  • install dependencies
  • run migrations
  • publish assets
  • compiling app assets
  • make cron job for scheduler
  • etc.

Some of actions you should do on every application update (composer update, git pull...) or branch change (git checkout) for preparing an application to work.

Laravel Initializer gives you the ability to declare these processes and run it by simple app:install and app:update artisan commands, which run predefined actions chain depending on the current environment.

Also app:update command could simplify your deploy script in Forge, Envoy.blade.php, laravel-deployer, bash script etc.

With Laravel Initializer you keep both of these processes in the source control.

Put a knowledge of application initialization process into the right place

Installation

Via Composer

composer require mad-web/laravel-initializer

then publish initializer classes:

php artisan vendor:publish --tag=initializers

It will create Install and Update classes in app directory which contains local and production methods according to different environments. This methods should return runner chain with specific actions to install or update processes.

You can override config key which stores current environment value, publish config file and set env_config_key value.

php artisan vendor:publish --provider="MadWeb\Initializer\InitializerServiceProvider" --tag=config

by default value is set to app.env for laravel, in most cases you don't need to override this value.

Usage

Usage of app:install and app:update command are the same except that app:install uses Install class and app:update uses Update class.

Install class contents:

namespace App;

use MadWeb\Initializer\Contracts\Runner;

class Install
{
    public function production(Runner $run)
    {
        $run->external('composer', 'install', '--no-dev', '--prefer-dist', '--optimize-autoloader')
            ->artisan('key:generate')
            ->artisan('migrate', ['--force' => true])
            ->artisan('storage:link')
//            ->dispatch(new MakeCronTask)
            ->external('npm', 'install', '--production')
            ->external('npm', 'run', 'production')
            ->artisan('route:cache')
            ->artisan('config:cache')
            ->artisan('event:cache');
    }

    public function local(Runner $run)
    {
        $run->external('composer', 'install')
            ->artisan('key:generate')
            ->artisan('migrate')
            ->artisan('storage:link')
            ->external('npm', 'install')
            ->external('npm', 'run', 'development');
    }
}

Update class contents:

namespace App;

use MadWeb\Initializer\Contracts\Runner;

class Update
{
    public function production(Runner $run)
    {
        $run->external('composer', 'install', '--no-dev', '--prefer-dist', '--optimize-autoloader')
            ->external('npm', 'install', '--production')
            ->external('npm', 'run', 'production')
            ->artisan('route:cache')
            ->artisan('config:cache')
            ->artisan('event:cache')
            ->artisan('migrate', ['--force' => true])
            ->artisan('cache:clear')
            ->artisan('queue:restart'); // ->artisan('horizon:terminate');
    }

    public function local(Runner $run)
    {
        $run->external('composer', 'install')
            ->external('npm', 'install')
            ->external('npm', 'run', 'development')
            ->artisan('migrate')
            ->artisan('cache:clear');
    }
}

You can add any other method which should have the same name as your environment name, for example staging, and define different actions.

If you need to run actions with root privileges separately, you can define a method according to the following convention:

namespace App;

use MadWeb\Initializer\Contracts\Runner;
use MadWeb\Initializer\Jobs\Supervisor\MakeQueueSupervisorConfig;
use MadWeb\Initializer\Jobs\Supervisor\MakeSocketSupervisorConfig;

class Install
{
    public function production(Runner $run) { ... }

    public function productionRoot(Runner $run)
    {
        $run->dispatch(new MakeQueueSupervisorConfig)
            ->dispatch(new MakeSocketSupervisorConfig)
            ->external('supervisorctl', 'reread')
            ->external('supervisorctl', 'update');
    }
}

Run it by passing "root" option:

artisan app:install --root

To see details of running actions use verbosity mode:

php artisan app:update -v

You can inject any service from service container in constructor:

class Update
{
    public function __construct(Filesystem $storage)
    {
        $this->storage = $storage;
    }
    // ...
}

If you want to move config classes from the app directory to a different place, rebind app.installer and app.updater keys of service container in the AppServiceProvider.

$this->app->bind('app.installer', \AnotherNamespace\Install::class);
$this->app->bind('app.updater', \AnotherNamespace\Update::class);

Runner API (available actions to run)

$run
    ->artisan('command', ['argument' => 'argument_value', '-param' => 'param_value', '--option' => 'option_value', ...]) // Artisan command
    ->external('command', 'argument', '-param', 'param_value', '--option=option_value', ...) // Any external command by arguments
    ->external('command argument -param param_value --option=option_value') // Any external command by string
    ->callable(function ($arg) {}, $arg) // Callable function (like for call_user_func)
    ->dispatch(new JobClass) // Dispatch job task
    ->dispatchNow(new JobClass) // Dispatch job task without queue
    ->publish(ServiceProvider::class) // Publish single service provider assets
    ->publish([
        ServiceProvider::class,
        AnotherServiceProvider::class,
    ]) // Publish multiple packages assets
    ->publish([ServiceProvider::class => 'public']) // Publish package assets with tag
    ->publish([ServiceProvider::class => ['public', 'assets']]) // Publish package assets with multiple tags
    ->publishForce(ServiceProvider::class) // Force publish, works in any variations
    ->publishTag('public') // Publish specific tag
    ->publishTag(['public', 'assets']) // Publish multiple tags
    ->publishTagForce('public') // Force publish tags

Laravel Nova

If you use Laravel Nova, don't forget to publish Nova assets on each update:

// Update class
$run
    ...
    ->artisan('nova:publish')
    // or
    ->publishTag('nova-assets')

Useful jobs

Laravel initializer provides some useful jobs to make initializing of your application much easier.

Create cron task for scheduling tasks

To enable Laravel Scheduling add dispatch MakeCronTask job to runner chain to create cron task for your application.

$run
    ...
    ->dispatch(new \MadWeb\Initializer\Jobs\MakeCronTask)

This job will add

* * * * * cd /path-to-your-project && php artisan schedule:run >> /dev/null 2>&1

to crontab list.

Create laravel-echo-server.json config file

If you use Laravel Echo Server for broadcasting events in your application, add dispatch MakeEchoServerConfig job to runner chain to create configuration file.

$run
    ...
    ->dispatch(new \MadWeb\Initializer\Jobs\MakeEchoServerConfig);

It will create configuration file with default options of laravel-echo-server and prefilled values from your laravel application configuration.

You can override default value by passing array into the job constructor. It would be a good practice to create additional config value for laravel-echo-server in broadcasting.php config:

/*
|--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Laravel Echo server configurations
|--------------------------------------------------------------------------
|
| Here you may define all of laravel echo server options
|
*/
'server' => [
    'authEndpoint' => '/broadcasting/auth',
    'port' => env('SOCKET_PORT', '6001'),
    'sslCertPath' => env('SSL_CERT', ''),
    'sslKeyPath' => env('SSL_PATH', '')
],

And pass these values to MakeEchoServerConfig job constructor.

$run
    ...
    ->dispatch(new \MadWeb\Initializer\Jobs\MakeEchoServerConfig(config('broadcasting.server')));

Create supervisor config file for queues

This job creates supervisor config file for queue workers. Add dispatch MakeQueueSupervisorConfig job to runner chain.

$run
    ...
    ->dispatch(new \MadWeb\Initializer\Jobs\Supervisor\MakeQueueSupervisorConfig);

This job creates configuration file with the command php artisan queue:work --sleep=3 --tries=3 in /etc/supervisor/conf.d/ folder by default, with a filename according to this convention your-application-name-queue.conf.

If you want to override default options, pass it into job constructor. For example if you want to use Laravel Horizon instead of default queue workers.

$run
    ...
    ->dispatch(new \MadWeb\Initializer\Jobs\Supervisor\MakeQueueSupervisorConfig([
        'command' => 'php artisan horizon',
    ]));

Create supervisor config file for laravel echo server

On the same way as MakeQueueSupervisorConfig job, you can use MakeSocketSupervisorConfig to create supervisor config file for launching laravel echo server. The difference from MakeQueueSupervisorConfig is the command node ./node_modules/.bin/laravel-echo-server start and the config filename is your-application-name-socket.conf.

Both config files save log files to your-app-path/storage/logs.

Installation by one command

For running php artisan app:install command, you should install composer dependencies at first. It would be nice to have the ability to install an application by one command. We provide nice hack to implement this behavior.

Add app-install script into scripts section in composer.json.

"scripts": {
    "app-install": [
        "@composer install",
        "@php artisan app:install"
    ],
}

Then you can run just

composer app-install

to initialize your application.

If your application has actions that require root privileges and you use Unix based system, add the following command into your runner chain:

public function production(Runner $run)
{
    $run->artisan(...)
        ...
        ->external('sudo', 'php', 'artisan', 'app:install', '--root');
}

public function productionRoot(Runner $run) { ... }

Safe Update

In cases when latest changes has been pulled from source control and some functionality of currently not installed package is used in one of a Service Provider you will get an error. To prevent this issue you should make composer install at first, to simplify this process you can define app-update script:

"scripts": {
    "app-update": [
        "@composer install",
        "@php artisan app:update"
    ],
},

Then you can run:

composer app-update

Upgrading

Please see UPGRADING for details.

Changelog

Please see CHANGELOG for more information what has changed recently.

Testing

composer test

Contributing

Please see CONTRIBUTING and CONDUCT for details.

Security

If you discover any security related issues, please email [email protected] instead of using the issue tracker.

Credits

Thanks Nuno Maduro for laravel-console-task package which gives pretty tasks outputs

License

The MIT License (MIT). Please see License File for more information.


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