Awesome Open Source
Awesome Open Source

Building Mobile Applications with React Native & AWS Amplify

In this workshop we'll learn how to build cloud-enabled mobile applications with React Native & AWS Amplify.

Amplify React Native Workshop

Topics we'll be covering:

Getting Started - Creating the React Native Application

To get started, we first need to create a new React Native project & change into the new directory using either the React Native CLI (See Building Projects With Native Code in the documentation) or Expo CLI.

We can use the React Native CLI or Expo to create a new app:

If you're using the React Native CLI (you're not using Expo)

Change into the app directory & install the dependencies

$ npx react-native init RNAmplify

$ cd RNAmplify

$ npm install --save aws-amplify aws-amplify-react-native uuid amazon-cognito-identity-js @react-native-community/netinfo

# or

$ yarn add aws-amplify aws-amplify-react-native uuid amazon-cognito-identity-js @react-native-community/netinfo

Next, for iOS you need to install the pods:

$ cd ios

$ pod install --repo-update

$ cd ..

If you are using Expo

$ npx expo init RNAmplify

> Choose a template: blank

$ cd RNAmplify

$ npm install --save aws-amplify aws-amplify-react-native uuid @react-native-community/netinfo

# or

$ yarn add aws-amplify aws-amplify-react-native uuid

Running the app

Next, run the app:

$ npx react-native run-ios

# or if running android

$ npx react-native run-android

# or, if using expo

$ expo start

Installing the CLI & Initializing a new AWS Amplify Project

Installing the CLI

Next, we'll install the AWS Amplify CLI:

$ npm install -g @aws-amplify/cli

Now we need to configure the CLI with our credentials:

$ amplify configure

If you'd like to see a video walkthrough of this configuration process, click here.

Here we'll walk through the amplify configure setup. Once you've signed in to the AWS console, continue:

  • Specify the AWS Region: your preferred region
  • Specify the username of the new IAM user: amplify-workshop-user

In the AWS Console, click Next: Permissions, Next: Tags, Next: Review, & Create User to create the new IAM user. Then, return to the command line & press Enter.

  • Enter the access key of the newly created user:
    accessKeyId: (<YOUR_ACCESS_KEY_ID>)
    secretAccessKey: (<YOUR_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY>)
  • Profile Name: amplify-workshop-user

Initializing A New AWS Amplify Project

Make sure to initialize this Amplify project in the root of your new React Native application

$ amplify init
  • Enter a name for the project: RNAmplify
  • Enter a name for the environment: dev
  • Choose your default editor: Visual Studio Code (or your favorite editor)
  • Please choose the type of app that you're building javascript
  • What javascript framework are you using react-native
  • Source Directory Path: /
  • Distribution Directory Path: /
  • Build Command: npm run-script build
  • Start Command: npm run-script start
  • Select the authentication method you want to use: AWS profile
  • Please choose the profile you want to use: amplify-workshop-user

Now, the AWS Amplify CLI has iniatilized a new project & you will see a couple of new files & folders: amplify & aws-exports.js. These files hold your project configuration.

Configuring the React Native application

The next thing we need to do is to configure our React Native application to be aware of our new AWS Amplify project. We can do this by referencing the auto-generated aws-exports.js file that is now in our root folder.

If you are using the React Native CLI (not using Expo)

To configure the app, open index.js and add the following code below the last import:

// index.js
import Amplify from 'aws-amplify'
import config from './aws-exports'
Amplify.configure(config)

Now, our app is ready to start using our AWS services.

If you are using the Expo (not using the React Native CLI)

To configure the app, open App.js and add the following code below the last import:

// App.js
import Amplify from 'aws-amplify'
import config from './aws-exports'
Amplify.configure(config)

Now, our app is ready to start using our AWS services.

Adding Authentication

To add authentication, we can use the following command:

$ amplify add auth
  • Do you want to use default authentication and security configuration? Default configuration
  • How do you want users to be able to sign in when using your Cognito User Pool? Username (keep default)
  • Do you want to configure advanced settings? No

Now, we'll run the push command and the cloud resources will be created in our AWS account.

$ amplify push

To view the AWS services any time after their creation, run the following command:

$ amplify console

Using the withAuthenticator component

To add authentication, we'll go into App.js and first import the withAuthenticator HOC (Higher Order Component) from aws-amplify-react:

// App.js
import { withAuthenticator } from 'aws-amplify-react-native'

Next, we'll wrap our default export (the App component) with the withAuthenticator HOC:

export default withAuthenticator(App, {
  includeGreetings: true
})

Now, we can run the app and see that an Authentication flow has been added in front of our App component. This flow gives users the ability to sign up & sign in.

To refresh, you can use one of the following commands:

# iOS Simulator
CMD + d # Opens debug menu
CMD + r # Reloads the app

# Android Emulator
CTRL + m # Opens debug menu
rr # Reloads the app

Accessing User Data

We can access the user's info now that they are signed in by calling Auth.currentAuthenticatedUser().

// App.js
import React from 'react';
import {
  SafeAreaView,
  StyleSheet,
  Text,
} from 'react-native';

import { withAuthenticator } from 'aws-amplify-react-native'

import { Auth } from 'aws-amplify' 

class App extends React.Component {
  async componentDidMount() {
    const user = await Auth.currentAuthenticatedUser()
    console.log('user:', user)
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <SafeAreaView style={styles.container}>
        <Text style={styles.title}>Hello World</Text>
      </SafeAreaView>
    )
  }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  container: {
    flex: 1,
    justifyContent: 'center',
    alignItems: 'center'
  },
  title: {
    fontSize: 28
  }
})

export default withAuthenticator(App, {
  includeGreetings: true
})

Signing out with a custom Sign Out button

We can also sign the user out using the Auth class & calling Auth.signOut(). This function returns a promise that is fulfilled after the user session has been ended & AsyncStorage is updated.

Because withAuthenticator holds all of the state within the actual component, we must have a way to rerender the actual withAuthenticator component by forcing React to rerender the parent component.

To do so, let's make a few updates:

// App.js
import React from 'react';
import {
  SafeAreaView,
  StyleSheet,
  Text,
} from 'react-native';

import { withAuthenticator } from 'aws-amplify-react-native'

import { Auth } from 'aws-amplify' 

class App extends React.Component {
  async componentDidMount() {
    const user = await Auth.currentAuthenticatedUser()
    console.log('user:', user)
  }
  signOut = () => {
    Auth.signOut()
      .then(() => this.props.onStateChange('signedOut'))
      .catch(err => console.log('err: ', err))
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <SafeAreaView style={styles.container}>
        <Text style={styles.title}>Hello World</Text>
        <Text onPress={this.signOut}>Sign Out</Text>
      </SafeAreaView>
    )
  }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  container: {
    flex: 1,
    justifyContent: 'center',
    alignItems: 'center'
  },
  title: {
    fontSize: 28
  }
})

export default withAuthenticator(App);

Custom authentication strategies

To view a final solution for a custom authentication strategy, check out the AWS Amplify React Native Auth Starter here.

This section is an overview and is considered an advanced part of the workshop. If you are not comfortable writing a custom authentication flow, I would read through this section and use it as a reference in the future. If you'd like to jump to the next section, click here.

The withAuthenticator component is a really easy way to get up and running with authentication, but in a real-world application we probably want more control over how our form looks & functions.

Let's look at how we might create our own authentication flow.

To get started, we would probably want to create input fields that would hold user input data in the state. For instance when signing up a new user, we would probably need 3 user inputs to capture the user's username, email, & password.

To do this, we could create some initial state for these values & create an event handler that we could attach to the form inputs:

// initial state
state = {
  username: '', password: '', email: ''
}

// event handler
onChangeText = (key, value) => {
  this.setState({ [key]: value })
}

// example of usage with TextInput
<TextInput
  placeholder='username'
  value={this.state.username}
  style={{ width: 300, height: 50, margin: 5, backgroundColor: "#ddd" }}
  onChangeText={v => this.onChange('username', v)}
/>

We'd also need to have a method that signed up & signed in users. We can us the Auth class to do thi. The Auth class has over 30 methods including things like signUp, signIn, confirmSignUp, confirmSignIn, & forgotPassword. Thes functions return a promise so they need to be handled asynchronously.

// import the Auth component
import { Auth } from 'aws-amplify'

// Class method to sign up a user
signUp = async() => {
  const { username, password, email } = this.state
  try {
    await Auth.signUp({ username, password, attributes: { email }})
  } catch (err) {
    console.log('error signing up user...', err)
  }
}

Adding a GraphQL API with AWS AppSync

To add a GraphQL API, we can use the following command:

$ amplify add api

Answer the following questions

  • Please select from one of the above mentioned services GraphQL
  • Provide API name: RestaurantAPI
  • Choose the default authorization type for the API API key
  • Enter a description for the API key public
  • After how many days from now the API key should expire 365
  • Do you want to configure advanced settings for the GraphQL API No
  • Do you have an annotated GraphQL schema? N
  • Choose a schema template: Single object with fields (e.g. “Todo” with ID, name, description)
  • Do you want to edit the schema now? (Y/n) Y

When prompted, update the schema to the following:

type Restaurant @model {
  id: ID!
  clientId: String
  name: String!
  description: String!
  city: String!
}

Next, deploy the API:

amplify push

? Are you sure you want to continue? Yes
? Do you want to generate code for your newly created GraphQL API: Yes
? Choose the code generation language target: javascript
? Enter the file name pattern of graphql queries, mutations and subscriptions: ./graphql/**/*.js
? Do you want to generate/update all possible GraphQL operations - queries, mutations and subscriptions: Yes
? Enter maximum statement depth [increase from default if your schema is deeply nested] (2)

Optional - To mock and test the API locally, you can run the mock command:

$ amplify mock api

This should start an AppSync Mock endpoint:

AppSync Mock endpoint is running at http://10.219.99.136:20002

Open the endpoint in the browser to use the GraphiQL Editor.

From here, we can now test the API.

Adding mutations from within the GraphiQL Editor.

In the GraphiQL editor, execute the following mutation to create a new restaurant in the API:

mutation createRestaurant {
  createRestaurant(input: {
    name: "Nobu"
    description: "Great Sushi"
    city: "New York"
  }) {
    id name description city
  }
}

Now, let's query for the restaurant:

query listRestaurants {
  listRestaurants {
    items {
      id
      name
      description
      city
    }
  }
}

We can even add search / filter capabilities when querying:

query searchRestaurants {
  listRestaurants(filter: {
    city: {
      contains: "New York"
    }
  }) {
    items {
      id
      name
      description
      city
    }
  }
}

Or, get an individual restaurant by ID:

query getRestaurant {
  getRestaurant(id: "RESTAURANT_ID") {
    name
    description
    city
  }
}

Interacting with the GraphQL API from our client application - Querying for data

Now that the GraphQL API is created we can begin interacting with it!

The first thing we'll do is perform a query to fetch data from our API.

To do so, we need to define the query, execute the query, store the data in our state, then list the items in our UI.

import React from 'react';
import {
  SafeAreaView,
  View,
  StyleSheet,
  Text,
} from 'react-native';

// imports from Amplify library
import { withAuthenticator } from 'aws-amplify-react-native'
import { API, graphqlOperation } from 'aws-amplify'

// import the GraphQL query
import { listRestaurants } from './graphql/queries'

class App extends React.Component {
  // define some state to hold the data returned from the API
  state = {
    restaurants: []
  }
  // execute the query in componentDidMount
  async componentDidMount() {
    try {
      const restaurantData = await API.graphql(graphqlOperation(listRestaurants))
      console.log('restaurantData:', restaurantData)
      this.setState({
        restaurants: restaurantData.data.listRestaurants.items
      })
    } catch (err) {
      console.log('error fetching restaurants...', err)
    }
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <SafeAreaView style={styles.container}>
        {
          this.state.restaurants.map((restaurant, index) => (
            <View key={index} style={styles.item}>
              <Text style={styles.name}>{restaurant.name}</Text>
              <Text style={styles.description}>{restaurant.description}</Text>
              <Text style={styles.city}>{restaurant.city}</Text>
            </View>
          ))
        }
      </SafeAreaView>
    )
  }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  container: {
    flex: 1,
    justifyContent: 'center',
  },
  item: { padding: 10 },
  name: { fontSize: 20 },
  description: { fontWeight: '600', marginTop: 4, color: 'rgba(0, 0, 0, .5)' },
  city: { marginTop: 4 }
})

export default withAuthenticator(App, { includeGreetings: true });

Performing mutations

Now, let's look at how we can create mutations. The mutation we will be working with is createRestaurant.

// App.js
import React from 'react';
import {
  SafeAreaView,
  View,
  StyleSheet,
  Text,
  TextInput,
  Button
} from 'react-native';

// imports from Amplify library
import { withAuthenticator } from 'aws-amplify-react-native'
import { API, graphqlOperation } from 'aws-amplify'

// import the GraphQL query
import { listRestaurants } from './graphql/queries'
// import the GraphQL mutation
import { createRestaurant } from './graphql/mutations'

// create client ID
import { v4 as uuid } from 'uuid'
const CLIENTID = uuid()

class App extends React.Component {
  // add additional state to hold form state as well as restaurant data returned from the API
  state = {
    name: '', description: '', city: '', restaurants: []
  }
  // execute the query in componentDidMount
  async componentDidMount() {
    try {
      const restaurantData = await API.graphql(graphqlOperation(listRestaurants))
      console.log('restaurantData:', restaurantData)
      this.setState({
        restaurants: restaurantData.data.listRestaurants.items
      })
    } catch (err) {
      console.log('error fetching restaurants...', err)
    }
  }
  // this method calls the API and creates the mutation
  createRestaurant = async() => {
    const { name, description, city  } = this.state
    // store the restaurant data in a variable
    const restaurant = {
      name, description, city, clientId: CLIENTID
    }
    // perform an optimistic response to update the UI immediately
    const restaurants = [...this.state.restaurants, restaurant]
    this.setState({
      restaurants,
      name: '', description: '', city: ''
      })
    try {
      // make the API call
      await API.graphql(graphqlOperation(createRestaurant, {
        input: restaurant
      }))
      console.log('item created!')
    } catch (err) {
      console.log('error creating restaurant...', err)
    }
  }
  // change form state then user types into input
  onChange = (key, value) => {
    this.setState({ [key]: value })
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <SafeAreaView style={styles.container}>
        <TextInput
          style={{ height: 50, margin: 5, backgroundColor: "#ddd" }}
          onChangeText={v => this.onChange('name', v)}
          value={this.state.name} placeholder='name'
        />
        <TextInput
          style={{ height: 50, margin: 5, backgroundColor: "#ddd" }}
          onChangeText={v => this.onChange('description', v)}
          value={this.state.description} placeholder='description'
        />
        <TextInput
          style={{ height: 50, margin: 5, backgroundColor: "#ddd" }}
          onChangeText={v => this.onChange('city', v)}
          value={this.state.city} placeholder='city'
        />
        <Button onPress={this.createRestaurant} title='Create Restaurant' />
        {
          this.state.restaurants.map((restaurant, index) => (
            <View key={index} style={styles.item}>
              <Text style={styles.name}>{restaurant.name}</Text>
              <Text style={styles.description}>{restaurant.description}</Text>
              <Text style={styles.city}>{restaurant.city}</Text>
            </View>
          ))
        }
      </SafeAreaView>
    )
  }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  container: {
    flex: 1,
    justifyContent: 'center',
  },
  item: { padding: 10 },
  name: { fontSize: 20 },
  description: { fontWeight: '600', marginTop: 4, color: 'rgba(0, 0, 0, .5)' },
  city: { marginTop: 4 }
})

export default withAuthenticator(App, { includeGreetings: true });

Challenge

Recreate this functionality in Hooks

For direction, check out the tutorial here

For the solution to this challenge, view the hooks file.

Adding a Serverless Function

Adding a basic Lambda Function

To add a serverless function, we can run the following command:

$ amplify add function

? Select which capability you want to add: Lambda function
? Provide an AWS Lambda function nam: basiclambda
? Choose the runtime that you want to use: NodeJS
? Choose the function template that you want to use: Hello World
? Do you want to configure advanced settings? N
? Do you want to edit the local lambda function now? Y

This should open the function package located at amplify/backend/function/basiclambda/src/index.js.

Edit the function to look like this, & then save the file.

exports.handler = async (event, contex) => {
  console.log('event: ', event)
  const body = {
    message: "Hello world!"
  }
  const response = {
    statusCode: 200,
    body
  }
  return response
}

Next, we can test this out by running:

$ amplify mock function basiclambda

? Provide the path to the event JSON object: src/event.json

You'll notice the following output from your terminal:

Ensuring latest function changes are built...
Starting execution...
event:  { key1: 'value1', key2: 'value2', key3: 'value3' }
Result:
{
  "statusCode": 200,
  "body": {
    "message": "Hello world!"
  }
}
Finished execution.

Where is the event data coming from? It is coming from the values located in event.json in the function folder (amplify/backend/function/basiclambda/src/event.json). If you update the values here, you can simulate data coming arguments the event.

Feel free to test out the function by updating event.json with data of your own.

Adding a function running an express server and invoking it from an API call (http)

Next, we'll build a function that will be running an Express server inside of it.

This new function will fetch data from a cryptocurrency API & return the values in the response.

To get started, we'll create a new function:

$ amplify add function

? Select which capability you want to add: Lambda function
? Provide an AWS Lambda function name: cryptofunction
? Choose the runtime that you want to use: NodeJS
? Choose the function template that you want to use: Serverless ExpressJS
? Do you want to configure advanced settings? No
? Do you want to edit the local lambda function now? Y

This should open the function package located at amplify/backend/function/cryptofunction/src/index.js. You'll notice in this file, that the event is being proxied into an express server:

exports.handler = (event, context) => {
  console.log(`EVENT: ${JSON.stringify(event)}`);
  awsServerlessExpress.proxy(server, event, context);
};

Instead of updating the handler function itself, we'll instead update amplify/backend/function/cryptofunction/src/app.js which has the actual server code we would like to be working with.

Here, in amplify/backend/function/cryptofunction/src/app.js, we'll add the following code & save the file:

// amplify/backend/function/cryptofunction/src/app.js

// you should see this code already there 👇:
app.use(function(req, res, next) {
  res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*")
  res.header("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Origin, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Accept")
  next()
});
// below the above code, add the following code 👇 (be sure not to delete any other code from this file)
const axios = require('axios')

app.get('/coins', function(req, res) {
  let apiUrl = `https://api.coinlore.com/api/tickers?start=0&limit=10`
  
  if (req && req.query) {
    // here we are checking to see if there are any query parameters, and if so appending them to the request
    const { start = 0, limit = 10 } = req.query
    apiUrl = `https://api.coinlore.com/api/tickers/?start=${start}&limit=${limit}`
  }

  axios.get(apiUrl)
    .then(response => {
      res.json({
        coins: response.data.data
      })
    })
    .catch(err => res.json({ error: err }))
})

In the above function we've used the axios library to call another API. In order to use axios, we need be sure that it will be installed by updating the package.json for the new function:

$ cd amplify/backend/function/cryptofunction/src

$ npm install axios

$ cd ../../../../../

Next, change back into the root directory.

Adding a REST API

Now that we've created the cryptocurrency Lambda function let's add an API endpoint so we can invoke it via http.

To add the REST API, we can use the following command:

$ amplify add api

? Please select from one of the above mentioned services: REST
? Provide a friendly name for your resource that will be used to label this category in the project: cryptoapi   
? Provide a path (e.g., /items): /coins   
? Choose lambda source: Use a Lambda function already added in the current Amplify project   
? Choose the Lambda function to invoke by this path: cryptofunction   
? Restrict API access: Y
? Who should have access? Authenticated users only
? What kind of access do you want for Authenticated users: read/create/update/delete
? Do you want to add another path? (y/N) N  

Now the resources have been created & configured & we can push them to our account:

$ amplify push

? Are you sure you want to continue? Y

Interacting with the new API

Now that the API is created we can start sending requests to it & interacting with it.

Let's request some data from the API:

// App.js
import React from 'react'
import { View, Text, StyleSheet } from 'react-native'
import { API } from 'aws-amplify'
import { withAuthenticator } from 'aws-amplify-react-native'

class App extends React.Component {
  state = {
    coins: []
  }
  async componentDidMount() {
    try {
      // to get all coins, do not send in a query parameter
      // const data = await API.get('cryptoapi', '/coins')
      const data = await API.get('cryptoapi', '/coins?limit=5&start=100')
      console.log('data from Lambda REST API: ', data)
      this.setState({ coins: data.coins })
    } catch (err) {
      console.log('error fetching data..', err)
    }
  }
  render() {
    return (
      <View>
        {
          this.state.coins.map((c, i) => (
            <View key={i} style={styles.row}>
              <Text style={styles.name}>{c.name}</Text>
              <Text>{c.price_usd}</Text>
            </View>
          ))
        }
      </View>
    )
  }
}

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  row: { padding: 10 },
  name: { fontSize: 20, marginBottom: 4 },
})

export default withAuthenticator(App, { includeGreetings: true })

Adding Analytics

To add analytics, we can use the following command:

$ amplify add analytics

Next, we'll be prompted for the following:

  • Provide your pinpoint resource name: amplifyanalytics
  • Apps need authorization to send analytics events. Do you want to allow guest/unauthenticated users to send analytics events (recommended when getting started)? Y

To deploy, run the push command:

$ amplify push

Recording events

Now that the service has been created we can now begin recording events.

To record analytics events, we need to import the Analytics class from Amplify & then call Analytics.record:

import { Analytics } from 'aws-amplify'

state = {username: ''}

async componentDidMount() {
  try {
    const user = await Auth.currentAuthenticatedUser()
    this.setState({ username: user.username })
  } catch (err) {
    console.log('error getting user: ', err)
  }
}

recordEvent = () => {
  Analytics.record({
    name: 'My test event',
    attributes: {
      username: this.state.username
    }
  })
}

<Button onPress={this.recordEvent} title='Record Event' />

To view the analytics in the console, run the console command:

$ amplify console

In the console, click on Analytics, then click on View in Pinpoint. In the Pinpoint console, click on events and then enable filters.

Working with Storage

To add storage, we can use the following command:

amplify add storage

Answer the following questions

  • Please select from one of the below mentioned services Content (Images, audio, video, etc.)
  • Please provide a friendly name for your resource that will be used to label this category in the project: rnworkshopstorage
  • Please provide bucket name: YOUR_UNIQUE_BUCKET_NAME
  • Who should have access: Auth users only
  • What kind of access do you want for Authenticated users?
❯◉ create/update
 ◉ read
 ◉ delete
amplify push

Now, storage is configured & ready to use.

What we've done above is created configured an Amazon S3 bucket that we can now start using for storing items.

For example, if we wanted to test it out we could store some text in a file like this:

import { Storage } from 'aws-amplify'

// create function to work with Storage
addToStorage = () => {
  Storage.put('textfiles/mytext.txt', `Hello World`)
    .then (result => {
      console.log('result: ', result)
    })
    .catch(err => console.log('error: ', err));
}

// add click handler
<Button onPress={this.addToStorage} title='Add to Storage' />

This would create a folder called textfiles in our S3 bucket & store a file called mytext.txt there with the code we specified in the second argument of Storage.put.

If we want to read everything from this folder, we can use Storage.list:

readFromStorage = () => {
  Storage.list('textfiles/')
    .then(data => console.log('data from S3: ', data))
    .catch(err => console.log('error fetching from S3', err))
}

If we only want to read the single file, we can use Storage.get:

readFromStorage = () => {
  Storage.get('textfiles/mytext.txt')
    .then(data => {
      console.log('data from S3: ', data)
      fetch(data)
        .then(r => r.text())
        .then(text => {
          console.log('text: ', text)
        })
        .catch(e => console.log('error fetching text: ', e))
    })
    .catch(err => console.log('error fetching from S3', err))
}

If we wanted to pull down everything, we can use Storage.list:

readFromStorage = () => {
  Storage.list('')
    .then(data => console.log('data from S3: ', data))
    .catch(err => console.log('error fetching from S3', err))
}

Multiple Serverless Environments

Now that we have our API up & running, what if we wanted to update our API but wanted to test it out without it affecting our existing version?

To do so, we can create a clone of our existing environment, test it out, & then deploy & test the new resources.

Once we are happy with the new feature, we can then merge it back into our main environment. Let's see how to do this!

Creating a new environment

To create a new environment, we can run the env command:

$ amplify env add

> Do you want to use an existing environment? No
> Enter a name for the environment: apiupdate
> Do you want to use an AWS profile? Yes
> Please choose the profile you want to use: appsync-workshop-profile

Now, the new environment has been initialize, & we can deploy the new environment using the push command:

$ amplify push

Now that the new environment has been created we can get a list of all available environments using the CLI:

$ amplify env list

Let's update the GraphQL schema to add a new field. In amplify/backend/api/RestaurantAPI/schema.graphql update the schema to the following:

type Restaurant @model {
  id: ID!
  clientId: String
  name: String!
  type: String
  description: String!
  city: String!
}

type ModelRestaurantConnection {
	items: [Restaurant]
	nextToken: String
}

type Query {
  listAllRestaurants(limit: Int, nextToken: String): ModelRestaurantConnection
}

In the schema we added a new field to the Restaurant definition to define the type of restaurant:

type: String

Now, we can run amplify push again to update the API:

$ amplify push

To test this out, we can go into the AppSync Console & log into the API.

You should now see a new API called RestaurantAPI-apiupdate. Click on this API to view the API dashboard.

If you click on Schema you should notice that it has been created with the new type field. Let's try it out.

To test it out we need to create a new user because we are using a brand new authentication service. To do this, open the app & sign up.

In the API dashboard, click on Queries.

Next, click on the Login with User Pools link.

Copy the aws_user_pools_web_client_id value from your aws-exports file & paste it into the ClientId field.

Next, login using your username & password.

Now, create a new mutation & then query for it:

mutation createRestaurant {
  createRestaurant(input: {
    name: "Nobu"
    description: "Great Sushi"
    city: "New York"
    type: "sushi"
  }) {
    id name description city type
  }
}

query listRestaurants {
  listAllRestaurants {
    items {
      name
      description
      city
      type
    }
  }
}

Merging the new environment changes into the main environment.

Now that we've created a new environment & tested it out, let's check out the main environment.

$ amplify env checkout local

Next, run the status command:

$ amplify status

You should now see an Update operation:

Current Environment: local

| Category | Resource name   | Operation | Provider plugin   |
| -------- | --------------- | --------- | ----------------- |
| Api      | RestaurantAPI   | Update    | awscloudformation |
| Auth     | cognito75a8ccb4 | No Change | awscloudformation |

To deploy the changes, run the push command:

$ amplify push

Now, the changes have been deployed & we can delete the apiupdate environment:

$ amplify env remove apiupdate

Do you also want to remove all the resources of the environment from the cloud? Y

Now, we should be able to run the list command & see only our main environment:

$ amplify env list

Removing Services

If at any time, or at the end of this workshop, you would like to delete a service from your project & your account, you can do this by running the amplify remove command:

$ amplify remove auth

$ amplify push

If you are unsure of what services you have enabled at any time, you can run the amplify status command:

$ amplify status

amplify status will give you the list of resources that are currently enabled in your app.

Deleting the project

To delete the entire project, run the delete command:

$ amplify delete

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