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Airbrake Ruby

Introduction

Airbrake Ruby is a plain Ruby notifier for Airbrake, the leading exception reporting service. Airbrake Ruby provides minimalist API that enables the ability to send any Ruby exception to the Airbrake dashboard. The library is extremely lightweight and it perfectly suits plain Ruby applications. For apps that are built with Rails, Sinatra or any other Rack-compliant web framework we offer the airbrake gem. It has additional features such as reporting of any unhandled exceptions automatically, integrations with Resque, Sidekiq, Delayed Job and many more.

Key features

  • Simple, consistent and easy-to-use library API[link]
  • Awesome performance (check out our benchmarks)[link]
  • Asynchronous exception reporting[link]
  • Promise support[link]
  • Flexible configuration options[link]
  • Support for proxying[link]
  • Support for environments[link]
  • Filters support (filter out sensitive or unwanted data that shouldn't be sent)[link]
  • Ability to ignore exceptions based on their class, backtrace or any other condition[link]
  • Support for Java exceptions occurring in JRuby
  • SSL support (all communication with Airbrake is encrypted by default)
  • Support for fatal exceptions (the ones that terminate your program)
  • Support for custom exception attributes[link]
  • Severity support[link]
  • Support for code hunks (lines of code surrounding each backtrace frame)[link]
  • Ability to add context to reported exceptions[link]
  • Dependency tracking[link]
  • Automatic and manual deploy tracking [link]
  • Performance monitoring for web applications (route statistics, SQL queries, Job execution statistics) [link]
  • Last but not least, we follow semantic versioning 2.0.0[link]

Installation

Bundler

Add the Airbrake Ruby gem to your Gemfile:

gem 'airbrake-ruby'

Manual

Invoke the following command from your terminal:

gem install airbrake-ruby

Example

This is the minimal example that you can use to test Airbrake Ruby with your project.

require 'airbrake-ruby'

# Every Airbrake notifier must configure
# two options: `project_id` and `project_key`.
Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.project_id = 105138
  c.project_key = 'fd04e13d806a90f96614ad8e529b2822'
end

# Asynchronous error delivery.
begin
  1/0
rescue ZeroDivisionError => ex
  # Return value is always `nil`.
  Airbrake.notify(ex)
end

puts 'A ZeroDivisionError was sent to Airbrake asynchronously!',
     "Find it at your project's dashboard on https://airbrake.io"

# Synchronous error delivery.
begin
  1/0
rescue ZeroDivisionError => ex
  # Return value is a Hash.
  response = Airbrake.notify_sync(ex)
end

puts "\nAnother ZeroDivisionError was sent to Airbrake, but this time synchronously.",
     "See it at #{response['url']}"

Configuration

project_id & project_key

You must set both project_id & project_key.

To find your project_id and project_key navigate to your project's General Settings and copy the values from the right sidebar.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.project_id = 105138
  c.project_key = 'fd04e13d806a90f96614ad8e529b2822'
end

proxy

If your server is not able to directly reach Airbrake, you can use a built-in proxy. By default, Airbrake Ruby uses a direct connection.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.proxy = {
    host: 'proxy.example.com',
    port: 4038,
    user: 'john-doe',
    password: 'p4ssw0rd'
  }
end

logger

By default, Airbrake Ruby outputs to STDOUT. The default logger level is Logger::WARN. It's possible to add your custom logger.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.logger = Logger.new('log.txt')
end

app_version

The version of your application that you can pass to differentiate exceptions between multiple versions. It's not set by default.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.app_version = '1.0.0'
end

versions

A hash of arbitrary versions that your application uses that you want to track (Rails, Linux kernel, API version, etc.). By default, it's empty.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.versions = {
    'Rails' => '5.2.0',
    'bundler' => '1.16.1',
    'LinuxKernel' => '4.4.0-97-generic'
  }
end

host

By default, it is set to airbrake.io. A host is a web address containing a scheme ("http" or "https"), a host and a port. You can omit the port (80 will be assumed) and the scheme ("https" will be assumed).

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.host = 'http://localhost:8080'
end

If your backend is hosted behind a subpath such as http://localhost:8080/api, make sure to append a trailing slash to the end of the URL:

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.host = 'http://localhost:8080/api/' # Note the trailing slash
end

root_directory

Configures the root directory of your project. Expects a String or a Pathname, which represents the path to your project. Providing this option helps us to filter out repetitive data from backtrace frames and link to GitHub files from our dashboard.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.root_directory = '/var/www/project'
end

environment

Configures the environment the application is running in. Helps the Airbrake dashboard to distinguish between exceptions occurring in different environments. By default, it's not set.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.environment = :production
end

ignore_environments

Setting this option allows Airbrake to filter exceptions occurring in unwanted environments such as :test. By default, it is equal to an empty Array, which means Airbrake Ruby sends exceptions occurring in all environments.

This will also disable performance stat collection for matched environments.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.ignore_environments = [:production, /test.+/]
end

timeout

The number of seconds to wait for the connection to Airbrake to open.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.timeout = 10
end

blocklist_keys

Specifies which keys in the payload (parameters, session data, environment data, etc) should be filtered. Before sending an error, filtered keys will be substituted with the [Filtered] label.

It accepts Strings, Symbols & Regexps, which represent keys of values to be filtered.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.blocklist_keys = [:email, /credit/i, 'password']
end

Airbrake.notify('App crashed!', {
  user: 'John',
  password: 's3kr3t',
  email: '[email protected]',
  credit_card: '5555555555554444'
})

# The dashboard will display this parameter as filtered, but other values won't
# be affected:
#   { user: 'John',
#     password: '[Filtered]',
#     email: '[Filtered]',
#     credit_card: '[Filtered]' }
Using Procs to delay filters configuration

If you cannot inline your keys (for example, they should be loaded from external process), there's a way to load them later. Let's imagine Keyloader.load_keys builds an Array of keys by talking to another process:

module Keyloader
  # Builds an Array of keys (talking to another process is omitted).
  def self.load_keys
    [:credit_card, :telephone]
  end
end

We need to wrap this call in a Proc, so the library can execute it later (it gets executed on first notify, only once):

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  # You can mix inline keys and Procs.
  c.blocklist_keys = [:email, proc { Keyloader.load_keys }, 'password']
end

The Proc must return an Array consisting only of the elements, which are considered to be valid for this option.

allowlist_keys

Specifies which keys in the payload (parameters, session data, environment data, etc) should not be filtered. All other keys will be substituted with the [Filtered] label.

It accepts Strings, Symbols & Regexps, which represent keys the values of which shouldn't be filtered.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.allowlist_keys = [:email, /user/i, 'account_id']
end

Airbrake.notify(StandardError.new('App crashed!'), {
  user: 'John',
  password: 's3kr3t',
  email: '[email protected]',
  account_id: 42
})

# The dashboard will display this parameter as is, but all other values will be
# filtered:
#   { user: 'John',
#     password: '[Filtered]',
#     email: '[email protected]',
#     account_id: 42 }
Using Procs to delay filters configuration

See documentation about blocklisting using Proc objects. It's identical.

code_hunks

Code hunks are lines of code surrounding each backtrace frame. When root_directory is set to some value, code hunks are collected only for frames inside that directory. If root_directory isn't configured, then first ten code hunks are collected. By default, it's set to true.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.code_hunks = false
end

performance_stats

Configures Airbrake Performance Monitoring statistics collection aggregated per route. These are displayed on the Performance tab of your project. By default, it's enabled.

The statistics is sent via:

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.performance_stats = true
end

query_stats

Configures Airbrake Performance Monitoring query collection. These are displayed on the Performance tab of your project. If performance_stats is false, setting this to true won't have effect because performance_stats has higher precedence. By default, it's enabled.

The statistics is sent via:

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.query_stats = false
end

job_stats

Configures Airbrake Performance Monitoring job (aka queue/task/worker) statistics collection. It is displayed on the Performance tab of your project. If performance_stats is false, setting this to true won't have effect because performance_stats has higher precedence. By default, it's enabled.

The statistics is sent via:

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.job_stats = false
end

error_notifications

Configures Airbrake error reporting. By default, it's enabled (recommended).

When it's disabled, Airbrake.notify & Airbrake.notify_sync are no-op.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.error_notifications = true
end

Asynchronous Airbrake options

The options listed below apply to Airbrake.notify, they do not apply to Airbrake.notify_sync.

queue_size

The size of the notice queue. The default value is 100. You can increase the value according to your needs.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.queue_size = 200
end

workers

The number of threads that handle notice sending. The default value is 1.

Airbrake.configure do |c|
  c.workers = 5
end

API

Airbrake

Airbrake.notify

Sends an exception to Airbrake asynchronously.

Airbrake.notify('App crashed!')

As the first parameter, accepts:

  • an Exception (will be sent directly)
  • any object that can be converted to String with #to_s (the information from the object will be used as the message of a RuntimeException that we build internally)
  • an Airbrake::Notice

As the second parameter, accepts a hash with additional data. That data will be displayed in the Params tab in your project's dashboard.

Airbrake.notify('App crashed!', {
  anything: 'you',
  wish: 'to add'
})

Accepts a block, which yields an Airbrake::Notice:

Airbrake.notify('App crashed') do |notice|
  notice[:params][:foo] = :bar
end

Returns an Airbrake::Promise, which can be used to read Airbrake error ids.

Setting severity

Severity allows categorizing how severe an error is. By default, it's set to error. To redefine severity, simply overwrite context/severity of a notice object. For example:

Airbrake.notify do |notice|
  notice[:context][:severity] = 'critical'
end

Airbrake.notify_sync

Sends an exception to Airbrake synchronously. Returns a Hash with an error ID and a URL to the error.

Airbrake.notify_sync('App crashed!')
#=> {"id"=>"1516018011377823762", "url"=>"https://airbrake.io/locate/1516018011377823762"}

Accepts the same parameters as Airbrake.notify.

Airbrake.add_filter

Runs a callback before .notify kicks in. Yields an Airbrake::Notice. This is useful if you want to ignore specific notices or filter the data the notice contains.

If you want to ignore a notice, simply mark it with Notice#ignore!. This interrupts the execution chain of the add_filter callbacks. Once you ignore a notice, there's no way to unignore it.

This example demonstrates how to ignore all notices.

Airbrake.add_filter(&:ignore!)

Instead, you can ignore notices based on some condition.

Airbrake.add_filter do |notice|
  notice.ignore! if notice.stash[:exception].is_a?(StandardError)
end

In order to filter a notice, simply change the data you are interested in.

Airbrake.add_filter do |notice|
  if notice[:params][:password]
    # Filter out password.
    notice[:params][:password] = '[Filtered]'
  end
end

Notices can carry custom objects attached to the notice stash. Such notices can be produced by build_notice manually or provided to you by an Airbrake integration:

# Build a notice and store a Request object in the stash.
notice = Airbrake.build_notice('oops')
notice.stash[:request] = Request.new

Airbrake.add_filter do |notice|
  # Access the stored request object inside a filter and interact with it.
  notice[:params][:remoteIp] = notice.stash[:request].env['REMOTE_IP']
end

By default, the stash contains an exception object accessible via notice.stash[:exception].

Airbrake.delete_filter

Deletes a filter added via add_filter. Expects a class name of the filter.

# Add a MyFilter filter (we pass an instance here).
Airbrake.add_filter(MyFilter.new)

# Delete the filter (we pass class name here).
Airbrake.delete_filter(MyFilter)

Note: This method cannot delete filters assigned via the Proc form.

Optional filters

The library adds a few filters by default. However, some of them are optional and not added. This is because such filters are overly specific and may not suit every type of application, so there's no need to include them only to clutter the notice object. You have to include such filters manually, if you think you need them. The list of optional filters include:

Airbrake::Filters::ThreadFilter

Attaches thread & fiber local variables along with general thread information.

Airbrake.add_filter(Airbrake::Filters::ThreadFilter.new)
Airbrake::Filters::DependencyFilter

Attaches loaded dependencies to the notice object (under context/versions/dependencies).

Airbrake.add_filter(Airbrake::Filters::DependencyFilter.new)
Airbrake::Filters::SqlFilter

Filters out sensitive data from queries that are sent via Airbrake.notify_query. Sensitive data is everything that is not table names or fields (e.g. column values and such).

Accepts a parameter, which signifies SQL dialect being used. Supported dialects:

  • :postgres
  • :mysql
  • :sqlite
  • :cassandra
  • :oracle
Airbrake.add_filter(Airbrake::Filters::SqlFilter.new(:postgres))
Using classes for building filters

For more complex filters you can use the special API. Simply pass an object that responds to the #call method.

class MyFilter
  def call(notice)
    # ...
  end
end

Airbrake.add_filter(MyFilter.new)

The library provides two default filters that you can use to filter notices: KeysBlocklist & KeysAllowlist.

Airbrake.build_notice

Builds an [Airbrake notice][notice-v3]. This is useful, if you want to add or modify a value only for a specific notice. When you're done modifying the notice, send it with Airbrake.notify or Airbrake.notify_sync.

notice = Airbrake.build_notice('App crashed!')
notice[:params][:username] = user.name
airbrake.notify_sync(notice)

See the block form of Airbrake.notify for shorter syntax.

Airbrake.close

Makes the notifier a no-op, which means you cannot use the .notify and .notify_sync methods anymore. It also stops the notifier's worker threads.

Airbrake.close
Airbrake.notify('App crashed!') #=> raises Airbrake::Error

If you want to guarantee delivery of all unsent exceptions on program exit, make sure to close your Airbrake notifier. Usually, this can be done with help of Ruby's at_exit hook.

at_exit do
  # Closes the default notifier.
  Airbrake.close
end

Airbrake.notify_deploy

Notifies Airbrake of a new deploy. Accepts a Hash with the following params:

Airbrake.notify_deploy(
  environment: 'development',
  username: 'john',
  repository: 'https://github.com/airbrake/airbrake-ruby',
  revision: '0b77f289166c9fef4670588471b6584fbc34b0f3',
  version: '1.2.3'
)

Airbrake.configured?

Checks whether the notifier is configured or not:

Airbrake.configured? #=> false

Airbrake.merge_context

Merges the provided context Hash with the notifier context. Upon a notify/notify_sync call the notifier context is attached to the notice object under the params/airbrake_context key.

After the error is attached, the notifier context is cleared, allowing other notify calls to start with a clean slate.

This method is specifically useful when you want to attach variables from different scopes during the execution of your program and then send them to Airbrake on error.

class MerryGrocer
  def load_fruits(fruits)
    Airbrake.merge_context(fruits: fruits)
  end

  def deliver_fruits
    Airbrake.notify('fruitception')
  end

  def load_veggies(veggies)
    Airbrake.merge_context(veggies: veggies)
  end

  def deliver_veggies
    Airbrake.notify('veggieboom!')
  end
end

grocer = MerryGrocer.new

# The context is added to `notice[:params][:airbrake_context]`.
Airbrake.add_filter do |notice|
  puts "Context: #{notice[:params][:airbrake_context] || 'empty'}"
end

# Load some fruits to the context.
grocer.load_fruits(%w(mango banana apple))

# Deliver the fruits. Note that we are not passing anything, `deliver_fruits`
# knows that we loaded something.
grocer.deliver_fruits
#=> Context: ['mango', 'banana', 'apple']

# Load some vegetables and deliver them to Airbrake. Note that the fruits have
# been delivered and therefore the grocer doesn't have them anymore. We merge
# veggies with the new context.
grocer.load_veggies(%w(cabbage carrot onion))
grocer.deliver_veggies
#=> Context: ['cabbage', 'carrot', 'onion']

# The context is empty again, feel free to load more.
grocer.deliver_veggies
#=> Context: empty

Airbrake.notify_request

Sends request information (performance statistics of a route) to Airbrake Performance Monitoring. The performance statistics are displayed on the Performance tab of your project.

Airbrake.notify_request(
  method: 'GET',
  route: '/things/1',
  status_code: 200,
  timing: 123.45 # ms
)

Optionally, you can attach information to the stash (request_id in this example).

Airbrake.notify_request(
  {
    # normal params
  },
  request_id: 123
)

This stash can be accessed from performance filters as resource.stash[:request_id].

Return value

When config.performance_stats = false, it always returns a rejected promise.

When config.performance_stats = true, then it aggregates statistics and sends as a batch every 15 seconds.

Airbrake.notify_request_sync

Sends request information (performance statistics of a route) to Airbrake Performance Monitoring synchronously. The performance statistics are displayed on the Performance tab of your project.

Accepts the same parameters as Airbrake.notify_request.

Return value

Always returns a Hash with response from the server.

Airbrake.notify_query

Sends SQL performance statistics to Airbrake. The performance statistics is displayed on the Performance tab of your project.

Airbrake.notify_query(
  method: 'GET',
  route: '/things/1',
  query: 'SELECT * FROM foos',
  func: 'foo', # optional
  file: 'foo.rb', # optional
  line: 123, # optional
  timing: 123.45 # ms
)

Optionally, you can attach information to the stash (request_id in this example).

Airbrake.notify_query(
  {
    # normal params
  },
  request_id: 123
)

This stash can be accessed from performance filters as resource.stash[:request_id].

Return value

When config.performance_stats = false, it always returns a rejected promise.

When config.performance_stats = true, then it aggregates statistics and sends as a batch every 15 seconds.

Airbrake.notify_query_sync

Sends SQL performance statistics to Airbrake synchronously. The performance statistics is displayed on the Performance tab of your project.

Accepts the same parameters as Airbrake.notify_query.

Return value

Always returns a Hash with response from the server.

Airbrake.notify_performance_breakdown

Sends performance breakdown statistics by groups to Airbrake. The groups are arbitrary (database, views, HTTP calls, etc.), but there can be only up to 10 groups per route in total.

Airbrake.notify_performance_breakdown(
  method: 'GET',
  route: '/things/1',
  response_type: 'json',
  groups: { db: 24.0, view: 0.4 }, # ms
  timing: 123.45 # ms
)

Optionally, you can attach information to the stash (request_id in this example).

Airbrake.notify_performance_breakdown(
  {
    # normal params
  },
  request_id: 123
)

This stash can be accessed from performance filters as resource.stash[:request_id].

Return value

When config.performance_stats = false, it always returns a rejected promise.

When config.performance_stats = true, then it aggregates statistics and sends as a batch every 15 seconds.

Airbrake.notify_performance_breakdown_sync

Sends performance breakdown statistics by groups to Airbrake synchronously. The groups are arbitrary (database, views, HTTP calls, etc.), but there can be only up to 10 groups per route in total.

Accepts the same parameters as Airbrake.notify_performance_breakdown.

Return value

Always returns a Hash with response from the server.

Airbrake.notify_queue

Sends queue (worker) statistics to Airbrake. Supports groups (similar to performance breakdowns).

  • queue - name of the queue (worker)
  • error_count - how many times this worker failed
  • groups - where the job spent its time
Airbrake.notify_queue(
  queue: "emails",
  error_count: 1,
  groups: { redis: 24.0, sql: 0.4 }, # ms
  timing: 0.05221 # ms
)

Optionally, you can attach information to the stash (job_id in this example).

Airbrake.notify_queue(
  {
    # normal params
  },
  job_id: 123
)

This stash can be accessed from performance filters as resource.stash[:job_id].

Return value

When config.performance_stats = false, it always returns a rejected promise.

When config.performance_stats = true, then it aggregates statistics and sends as a batch every 15 seconds.

Airbrake.notify_queue_sync

Sends queue (worker) statistics to Airbrake synchronously.

Accepts the same parameters as Airbrake.notify_queue.

Return value

Always returns a Hash with response from the server.

Airbrake.add_performance_filter

Adds a performance filter that filters performance data. Works exactly like Airbrake.add_filter. The only difference is that instead of Airbrake::Notice it yields performance data (such as Airbrake::Query or Airbrake::Request). It's invoked after notify_request or notify_query (but notify calls don't trigger it!).

Airbrake.add_performance_filter do |resource|
  resource.ignore! if resource.route =~ %r{/health_check}
end

Airbrake.delete_performance_filter

Deletes a performance filter added via Airbrake.add_performance_filter. Works exactly like Airbrake.delete_filter.

Notice

Notice#ignore!

Ignores a notice. Ignored notices never reach the Airbrake dashboard. This is useful in conjunction with Airbrake.add_filter.

notice.ignore!

Notice#ignored?

Checks whether the notice was ignored.

notice.ignored? #=> false

Notice#[] & Notice#[]=

Accesses a notice's payload, which can be read or filtered. Payload includes:

  • :errors
  • :context
  • :environment
  • :session
  • :params
notice[:params][:my_param] = 'foobar'

Notice#stash[] & Notice#stash[]=

Each notice can carry arbitrary objects stored in the notice stash, accessible through the stash method. Callbacks defined via add_filter can access the stash and attach stored object's values to the notice payload:

notice.stash[:my_object] = Object.new

Airbrake.add_filter do |notice|
  # Access :my_object from the stash and directly call its method. The return
  # value will be sent to Airbrake.
  notice[:params][:object_id] = notice.stash[:my_object].object_id
end

Promise

Airbrake::Promise represents a simplified promise object (similar to promises found in JavaScript), which allows chaining callbacks that are executed when the promise is either resolved or rejected.

Promise#then

Attaches a callback to be executed when a promise is resolved (fulfilled). The promise is resolved whenever the Airbrake API successfully accepts your exception.

Yields successful response containing the id of an error at Airbrake and URL to the error at Airbrake. Returns self.

Airbrake.notify('Oops').then { |response| puts response }
#=> {"id"=>"00054415-8201-e9c6-65d6-fc4d231d2871",
#    "url"=>"http://localhost/locate/00054415-8201-e9c6-65d6-fc4d231d2871"}

Promise#rescue

Attaches a callback to be executed when a promise is rejected. The promise is rejected whenever the API returns an error response.

Yields an error message in the form of String explaining the failure and returns self.

Airbrake.notify('Oops').rescue { |error| puts error }
#=> Failed to open TCP connection to localhostt:80

Custom exception attributes

The library supports custom exception attributes. This is useful if you work with custom exceptions, which define non-standard attributes and you can't attach any additional data with help of the add_filter API due to the fact that the data isn't available at configuration time yet.

In this case, you could define a special hook method on your exception called #to_airbrake. The method must return a Hash the keys of which must be a subset of the ones mentioned in the Notice#[] API.

class MyException
  def initialize
    @http_code = 404
  end

  # The library expects you to define this method. You must return a Hash,
  # containing the keys you want to modify.
  def to_airbrake
    { params: { http_code: @http_code } }
  end
end

# The `{ http_code: 404 }` Hash will transported to the Airbrake dashboard via
# the `#to_airbrake` method.
Airbrake.notify(MyException.new)

Note: you don't have to call Airbrake.notify manually to be able to benefit from this API. It should "just work".

Benchmark

.measure

Measures monotonic time for the given operation. Returns elapsed time in milliseconds.

time = Airbrake::Benchmark.measure do
  (1..10_000).inject(:*)
end

puts "Time: #{time}"
#=> Time: 67.40199995040894

TimedTrace

Represents a chunk of code performance of which was measured and stored under a label. The chunk is called a "span". Such spans can be used for performance breakdown reporting.

.span

# Measure time for a span called 'operation'.
timed_trace = Airbrake::TimedTrace.span('operation') do
  call_something
end
timed_trace.spans #=> { 'operation' => 0.123 }

# Send the spans to the Airbrake dashboard.
Airbrake.notify_performance_breakdown(
  method: 'GET',
  route: '/things/1',
  response_type: 'json',
  groups: timed_trace.spans
)

See full documentation for more examples.

Additional notes

Exception limit

The maximum size of an exception is 64KB. Exceptions that exceed this limit will be truncated to fit the size.

Running benchmarks

To run benchmarks related to asynchronous delivery, make sure to start a web server on port 8080. We provide a simple server, which can be started with this command (you need to have the Go programming language installed):

go run benchmarks/server.go

In order to run benchmarks against master, add the lib directory to your LOAD_PATH and choose the benchmark you are interested in:

ruby -Ilib benchmarks/notify_async_vs_sync.rb

Reporting critical exceptions

Critical exceptions are unhandled exceptions that terminate your program. By default, the library doesn't report them. However, you can either depend on the airbrake gem instead, which supports them, or you can add the following code somewhere in your app:

at_exit do
  Airbrake.notify_sync($!) if $!
end

Supported Rubies

  • CRuby >= 2.3.0
  • JRuby >= 9k
  • Rubinius >= 2.2.10

Contact

In case you have a problem, question or a bug report, feel free to:

License

The project uses the MIT License. See LICENSE.md for details.


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